Posts Tagged ‘Australia’

Habitat Association’s Margaret O’Toole’s Art Exhibition

At the Gallery Cafe Surry Hills one of the inner Sydney suburban townships, Margaret O’Toole exhibited several water-colour paintings.

The exhibition was on  the 5th of October 2012 and was a fantastic display of her art.

Pictured below is Pearl Williams, Curator of the exhibition.

Curator of Habitat Art Exhibition

Pearl Williams

 

“Galah” a Margaret O’Toole Watercolour 2012

The Galah or Cacatua roseicapilla, is a very common bird throughout Australia. It is an elegant bird standing between 34 and 38 cm tall. With a soft pink breast and grey wings the colour of ash, they can often be seen to changing colour when traveling together in flight.

Their natural habitat is grassland, woodland, scrubland and farmland. However, it is not common to see these birds in urban areas and even in the City. They are a nomadic species, but will not go too far from water.

Galah

Margaret has depicted her Galah in the woodlands. New South Wales has large expanses of woodlands, both east and west of the Great Divide.

On the Central Coast where Margaret lives, Galahs are a fairly common sight, especially in the spring. Often they are seen on grass reserves near the estuaries and lakes foraging for grass seeds in spring’s golden sunlight.

Comments by David Holland

Galah (Cacatua roseicapilla), female, looking ...

Galah (Cacatua roseicapilla), female, looking out from nesting hollow, Austin’s Ferry, Tasmania, Australia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Pair of Lorikeets by Margaret O’Toole

Two Rainbow Lorikeets at Newport Aquarium. Thi...

Two Rainbow Lorikeets at Newport Aquarium. This subspecies of the Rainbow Lorikeet is also called Forsten’s Lorikeet (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Water colour painting can produce some amazing pieces of artwork. Margaret again has chosen birds as a subject for her water-colour.

This depicts two Australian native birds. A Rainbow Lorikeet with the yellowy Green neck frill and the slightly larger northern territory variety called the Red-collared Lorikeet.

Rainbow Lorikeet

The rainbow lorikeet is a common sight on the Central Coast of NSW in Australia and was the star of the show in the Currumbin sanctuary years ago when an enterprising family opened their back yard up to the public to show the spectacle of feeding these pretty birds.

Buff Point from a distance – by Margaret O’Toole

Another watercolour from our member artist Margaret O’Toole.

This painting is of the sleepy Central Coast locality of Buff Point. The painting is of a view looking across Budgewoi Lake from the Toukley Bridge. Normally with this view one wouldn’t pick up the diversity of colour Margaret has found in this depiction of the landscape across the lake.

The northern part of the Central Coast in New South Wales is a beautiful and restful place with several saltwater lakes, although shallow, provide good vistas and excellent boating in sheltered waters.

I remember one still morning taking my own boat across from the far shore in the painting, south past the bridge and to the opening of the Wyong River, twice the distance again from Buff Point to the Bridge. On this morning the water was like glass and the boat was on the plane breaking the stillness of the water as it glided southward.

 

By David Holland

Looking towards Buff Point from Toukley Bridge

Transport for NSW Long Term Master Plan – Submission on Discussion Paper

As an advocate for both adaptive thinking and the Environment the Habitat Association for Arts and Environment has included the latest publication by one of its members, David Holland, on transport planning for New South Wales.

For those who are surfing the web from outside of Australia, New South Wales is arguably the most populous State in Australia and has a large economy in Australian terms.

This means that transport planning in New South Wales (NSW) is pivotal to the future success of that economy and the we being of the residents and workers of the State.

We may even go as far as to say that without a solid strategy for the future and new co-operation between the various transport agencies, NSW is poised to produce more transport bottleneck which will affect the states future prosperity. The submission outline three themes that Mr. Holland feels are important for the way forward. They are sustainability, security and reliability.

The submission not only looks at very practical aspects of providing a sustainable public transport system, but also sustainable ways to operate transport systems into the future. This is highlighted in the approach related to handling freight. The submission proposes a logical but revolutional way to handle freight service between regions and between other Australian States.

The use of renewable energy in the rail system is touched on as a way for the State to meet renewable energy targets.

The Central Coast of NSW is referred to in much of the submission. David believes that regional Australia is often left out of detailed transport planning processes because of the assumption that all commuting, as has been traditionally the case, is flowing to and from the Sydney metropolitan areas. With the slow but steady improvement of job opportunities in the regions, more and more commuting is being done intra-regionally. This means that public transport services should not only accommodate this trend but transport planning should drive this trend, providing appropriate infrastructure to give greater opportunity for regional investment in the growing regional economic powerhouses of the Illawarra, the Central Coast, the far west of Sydney around Penrith and the Blue Mountains, and the south west of Sydney around Campbelltown.

To Read More follow this link>:

Eastern Rosella by Margaret Ellem

Yet another artwork by one of our Habitat artists,

Mararet Ellem (O’Toole) has painted a lifelike watercolour of the Eastern Rosella.

The Eastern Rosella is often seen in the Sydney regions of New South Wales Australia.

You can see these birds foregoing in trees in this area. Margaret probably found this one near her home on the Central Coast of NSW.

The Habitat Association announcing a new project to the world. Visions of Inner Sydney.

This project has been in the background for many years. It is a collection of photographs of the inner suburbs of Sydney.

Dr. Ray Rauscher has been conducting this study one day a week over many years. While research is still being done, and the full understanding of what is actually happening in a social and aesthetic sense in the inner city is not apparent through the photographic study, some trends are starting to be seen.

 

The study at present is in a stage of categorising and familiarisation of similar aspects of the changes and adaptations of this urban environment in the single largest and oldest city in Australia.

Below is a taste of the kind of photograph that is part of the study material.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now go to the Habitat Association for Arts and Environment dedicated site for the project of “Visions of Inner Sydney”

< Click Here >

Influencing the Australian Federal Government on Renewable Energy Policy

English: Greenchoice is a renewable-energy sup...

By David Holland

During the year 2006 the local federal member for Dobell NSW sent a letter to his constituents asking them to write to him outlining any issues that concern them.  Not to be deterred by never taking up such an opportunity before, I wrote back to the member detailing some of my concerns regarding the direction of policy, than currently being followed by the Howard government, and outlined some of the opportunities useful for Australia to follow in efforts to reduce carbon dioxide emission and create a more sustainable way to produce energy for domestic, industrial and automotive uses within Australia.

The member was a liberal party MP and impressed enough with the letter to pass it on to the then Minster for the Environment, however no letter was forthcoming from that the Minister in reply to the local member.

Not to be deterred in those troublesome times of ‘Work Choices’, a policy by the Howard government to reorganize the Australian workforce, a policy that was soon to topple that government, I wrote to the shadow minister for the environment, the Hon. Peter Garret, who responded to my letter.

Then on the eve of the 2007 election, a repackaged letter adding a considerable amount of new information was sent directly to the opposition leader, who was soon to sweep into power as the Prime Minister, The Hon. Kevin Rudd.

Due to the amount of work this new Labor PM was about to do, I was not expecting any response in the near future, however I was confident that this letter was at least read, if not influential on the new government’s policy direction.

During the next 12 months from November 2007, I noticed that policy was set in the right direction for renewable energy to become a major player in Australian Energy production, but somehow real on the ground actions and expenditures were not supporting the policy move towards renewable energy. The global financial crisis had caused a lot of money that I had hoped to be used to support the move to cleaner energy, to be spent on a range of other projects. Some quite important infrastructure projects, and other projects related to energy consumption that would have limited value in the long-term towards any real change to Australia’s mix of energy sources.

As a result, in 2009, I sent another, completely new letter to Prime Minister Rudd, encouraging action towards real change to Australia’s energy mix, this time high lighting transport applications for sustainable fuels and modifications to infrastructure to support change.

After the change to the Prime Minister ship in 2009, I resolved to refocus my effort by giving a full and detailed update on all the letters sent the government, and outline the level of achievement Australia had made up until 2010 as a way of demonstrating, the change already underway caused by the government’s policy settings.

The articles are referenced below:

Following these two articles being sent to Prime Minister Gillard, I received two letters from the government. The first was from the office of Prime Minister Gillard, the detail of which is available on the following link.

The second letter was from the Department of Resources, Energy and Tourism. The article below was written around the contents of the letter from the Department, which outlines the direction of the actions expected by the Gillard government in the near future to encourage the implementation of renewable energy uptake within the Australian industry.

Reply Letter from the Office of the Hon. Martin Ferguson AM MP, Minister for Resources and Energy 20 Jul 2011

Following is a researched explanation of the above letter.

Read More ….

New Centre for the Habitat Association, The Habitat Centre for Renewable Energy

The Habitat Association is proud to announce the coming online of “The Habitat Centre for Renewable Energy”.

With the large amount of interest in this subject under our Gallery2020 Publishing blog site we have decided to open our Centre for Renewable Energy to be used as a central location for discussion about developments in renewable technology.

It is a site that the Habitat Association has dedicated for Habitat Association for Arts and Environment members to contribute articles containing interesting facts, developments and new technologies to the world.

Click here to access this new blog site.

Renewable energy initiatives budgeted by the Gillard government

With an informative reply from the director of the co-ordination and renewable energy branch of the Department of Climate Change and Renewable Energy Efficiency we learn that over $5 billion dollars have been set aside for research and business development for the development of renewable energy initiatives in Australia through the Gillard governments within the Clean Energy Initiative to be administered by the Australian Centre for Renewable Energy.

The flagship of this enterprising funding is the Solar flagship program which will fund one solar voltaic renewable energy project and one solar thermal energy generation project. The funds allocated to this is $1.5 billion.

In addition the government’s  Clean Energy Initiative is drawing together $560 million under the Australian Centre for Renewable Energy (ACRE) to encourage development of project research efforts that can be implemented into viable product to produce electrical renewable power for Australia’s future energy needs.

ACRE is promoting not only renewable energy generators by innovative storage systems similar to the Ammonia Energy Storage system of Wizard Power.

Another $100 million dollars as part of the ACRE initiatives is allocated under the Renewable Energy Venture Capital Fund to help support private investment in critical early stage investments for the development of emerging renewable technologies.

The last program mentioned in the reply letter, but probably at least the most important is the building of supporting infrastructure for the emerging renewable energy industry in Australia. Without extensive government investment in this crucial area of infrastructure, few projects remain viable away from the existing electricity grid. Private investment is unlikely to provide capital for this type of visionary but risky type of venture. With $1 billion invested by the federal government under the Connecting Renewables program and a commitment to see the project finished, operational and utilised by the renewable energy industry, the government is committed to build new electricity connections over the next ten years to remote areas where higher levels of solar, wind and other renewable energy supplies are available.

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